Plastic Surgery Articles

  • You Deserve An Expert Injectorâ„¢

    The face is extremely complex. Myriad nerve endings, thousands of muscle fibers, hundreds of glands, veins, ducts and layers. Add to this the fact that no two faces are identical—we age differently and develop wrinkles in a variety of locations and intensities. Carefully assessing the appropriate locations, choosing the right combination and the right amount of injections to achieve the desired results requires in-depth knowledge, finesse, and surgical precision. Facial rejuvenation is an art and a science. An artful eye and a masterful touch only comes with extensive training and experience.

    James Green, MD is a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon and Certified ExpertInjector™ with over 25 years of experience in surgical and injectable procedures.

    Injectables can be a very effective treatment for non-invasive facial rejuvenation. Injectable Botox and fillers are used to reduce wrinkles, lines, deep folds, and replacing lost volume, often resulting in a more youthful appearance.


    It’s not tupperware—it’s your face.
    We recommend being cautious and selective in choosing who performs your injectable treatments. Botox parties and under-qualifed practitioners carry an increased level of risk. The most common mistake is over-treatment, going too far, and producing an unnatural or unattractive result. Worst case scenarios can include: nerve damage, facial paralysis, pain, blindness, and the injection of off-brand, or black market medications.

    The ExpertInjector™ program qualifies board-certified plastic surgeons to perform injectable procedures, applying the highest standards of patient safety, reliable results and consumer education. In order to qualify to be an ExpertInjector™, a doctor must meet a long list of stringent criteria, including:

    • Complete and proper training
    • Administer injectables that are FDA-approved
    • Purchase injectables only directly from the manufacturer
    • Demonstrate the expertise to manage potential complications and problems
    • Offer a variety of injectable and educate patients about their options and expected results
    • Personally perform or oversee all administered treatments

  • Natural Effects Of Aging: Forehead Wrinkles

    The forehead is especially susceptible to signs of aging, simply because it’s so expressive. Surprise, concern, interest, disbelief, anger, joy and the majority of other human emotions all transform the brow and shift the eyebrows. Repetitive expressions over many years eventually become wrinkles, and wrinkles eventually become deep creases. These “memory lines” in the forehead have a tendency to make a person look concerned, stern, or just older than they actually are.

    How We Treat It

    Muscles tend to work in opposing directions. In the brow, one set of muscles pulls the forehead up while depressor muscles are pulling down. We use Botox to treat various muscle groups, relaxing them, and rebalancing the amount of upward and downward pulling forces. After just one treatment, patients often look noticeably less angry, less serious, and more relaxed.

    Care must be taken not to over-treat the forehead muscles. Too much lift can result in an unattractive, surprised expression. Some inexperienced doctors will over-relax the muscles, leaving the face with hardly any expression at all! An expert injector who has comprehensive training in facial anatomy can appropriately relax the muscles without paralyzing them, and treat the depressor groups to create just the right amount of lift, creating noticeable improvements with a natural appearance.

    With regular treatments, lines can dissipate and the patient can develop a smoother forehead. After a few years, muscles adjust to the new balance, and treatments can become less frequent and even more refined.

  • Crows Feet Eye Wrinkles

    A powerful and protective muscle surrounds the eye. In a split-second, it can squeeze the area shut, completely closing and shielding the pupil from harm. It’s also a very expressive muscle. Squinting, smiling and other facial emotions engage this area of the face hundreds of times per day. With decades of folding and refolding skin can develop noticeable wrinkles. Crows feet are wrinkles that radiate from the corners of the eyes. They are harmless and completely natural, but can make us appear older than we are, and more tired than we actually feel.

    Eye cremes, peels and cleansers can improve the outer layers of the skin, while collagen-inducing skin care treatments like Pelevé radio frequency treatments and SkinPen micro-needling treatments can improve deeper layers of the dermis.

    A somewhat more aggressive approach is to address the underlying muscles themselves. When correctly applied, Botox injections relax the muscle around the eye, softening our expressions, to create a younger and more pleasant appearance. Botox is highly versatile; you can treat different areas, add more or less, and fine-tune the results over time. With the muscles relaxed, wrinkles are less pronounced and expression lines begin to fade. Botox is not permanent, and follow-up treatments will need to be scheduled every 3–4 months. A Botox treatment averages $350–700, depending on how much of the serum is used.

    It’s important not to over-treat any area with Botox. The goal is to only soften expressions. An over-application of Botox can leave us with an unnatural lack of expression, which will look far worse than a few wrinkles. This is one of the primary reasons Botox should only be applied by expert injectors with surgical experience and in-depth knowledge of facial anatomy.

    Some doctors offer surgical solutions, sometimes referred to as “permanent Botox.” We discourage patients for taking this route for a number of reasons, it’s expensive, involves greater risk, has a longer recovery time and is difficult to get right. The procedure involves surgically removing certain muscle fibers to permanently imitate the effect of Botox. But unlike Botox injections, if there’s a bad result, the problem will not fade over time. If the appearance looks under-treated or asymmetrical, another surgery would be required. If the effect looks over-treated, that can be difficult or even impossible to reverse.

    For optimal results, we recommend using Botox to soften expressions, and combining skin care to improve the health, elasticity, tone and texture of the skin around the eyes.

  • Form Stable Implants (Gummy Bear Implants)

    Form stable, cohesive gel implants provide a more natural contour.

    To date, saline and silicone implants have essentially been round. Even though we can get good results with round implants, a natural-looking breast tends to have a more “teardrop” profile. Some efforts have been made through the years to create implants that have a natural shape, using a cohesive gel, meaning a gel that could hold a different shape. The shortcoming of these implants was that they weren’t cohesive enough, and over time we found that they would lose their special shape and gradually become spherical.

    The new generation of form stable, shaped gel implants puts this issue to rest. They are made of a truly cohesive gel that comes in a variety of sizes and contours. Sometimes referred to as “Gummy Bear Implants”, they hold their basic shape even when upright in the palm of your hand. These implants look more natural, feel more natural, impart upper and lower fullness using less material and the complication rates are even lower. That is a lot of good news. It’s certainly the biggest breast implant innovation in a long time. As physicians, we are cautious in embracing new products that don’t have an established, positive track record in the field, and shaped gel implants are no exception. Fortunately, the data is there. These implants have only recently been approved by the FDA for use in the United States market, but they have been used extensively in Europe for many years. The indicators are good: 69% lower capsular contracture rate (hardening of tissues around the implant), 96.5% satisfaction rate in patients who have had the implants for seven years, and they are considered to look and feel “most natural” among available implant options.

    What Are the Drawbacks?

    This type of implant is not for everybody. Only about half of our patients may qualify as good candidates for this type of implant. If there is a lot of extra skin around the breast or the nipples are positioned too low, it’s not going to be a good choice. If the candidate desires exaggerated upper breast fullness or wants to be very large breasted, a round implant is a better option. Good candidates have tighter skin envelopes, well-proportioned if small breasts, no major asymmetries between right and left breast and desire a more natural level of upper breast fullness. By law, candidates must be over 22 years of age for all gel implants, 18 for saline implants.

    It is more technical and more expensive. Placing a round object inside the body is often more forgiving than placing a shape that has specific alignment requirements. Teardrop profiles need to fit the body with a more exacting and technical procedure. The incision for inserting these implants is slightly larger, the time we spend in the operating room is longer and the implants themselves are more expensive than other options. A shaped gel implant procedure will typically cost $600 more than round implants.

    How Do They Feel?

    Saline implants may feel slightly less soft than natural tissue. Silicone implants are sometimes considered to feel softer than saline implants and natural tissue. Shaped gel implants are considered to feel the “most natural” of these three options.

  • Choosing A Plastic Surgeon

    Although many doctors claim to practice plastic surgery, not all have the same degree of surgical training. Motivated by profit, and taking a few seminars put on by manufactures of new products and procedures; many family practitioners, dentists, oral surgeons and even OB/GYNs have added some plastic surgery procedures to their practice, including certain types of skin care and injectables.

    Frankly, a few seminars and classes does not make anybody an expert. It takes much more time and expertise, particularly with regard to cosmetic surgery. In lesser hands, the results can be mediocre, and sometimes patients can get hurt. Because someone says they trained in a procedure—they can seem trustworthy. Yet training, in this sense, doesn’t mean very much when it comes to practice. When dealing with any doctor who practices plastic surgery, it is important to ask how many similar cases they have done, and over what period of time–because experience is key.

    Because cosmetic surgery is often elective, the patient is not usually in immediate need of the procedure. This affords patients plenty of time to carefully choose the right plastic surgeon. It is important to be aware that no one surgeon is sufficiently trained and experienced in every possible cosmetic procedure. You want the highest quality of patient care and experience for the specific procedure you are interested in. Depending on what feature you are hoping to change, the plastic surgeon may suggest an additional procedure to achieve the desired look. These suggestions should not, however, be taken as pressuring comments. If the doctor is pushing you in a direction that is uncomfortable to you, you should seek another opinion.

    Our founding surgeon explains how hard he worked to become the surgeon he is today: “It takes at least five years of training to become a plastic surgeon. I spent an extra two-and-a-half years in training, not because I am slow, but because I know it’s that important. As a Junior Resident I was awarded the Outstanding Surgical Resident honor, even beating out chief residents. The following year, as a Senior Resident, I won the award again. When I went back as a judge the following year, residents joked that the feared Jim Green would win it yet again. This story isn’t about vanity, it’s about commitment. I think there is a certain degree of talent involved in plastic surgery. But it’s not all talent. As my art professor in Paris told me when I asked him, How much talent does it take to make this? His answer: twenty percent talent and eighty percent hard work.

    I and most plastic surgeons are board certified and members of the American Society of Plastic Surgery (ASPS). This in my opinion is a fundamental requirement. Additionally, I am a member of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) and a fellow of the American College of Surgeons. I have been practicing plastic and reconstructive surgery for over 25 years. Since 1990 I have performed over 3,500 aesthetic surgeries. I’ve performed over 3,000 reconstructive cases. With an excellent reputation in the community, I have served on multiple boards and committees including President of Medical Staff and Chairman of the Department of Surgery. I have worked with nearly all the physicians in the area and receive their referrals. You don’t have to travel to a metropolitan area to find expert skills and counsel. You don’t even have to drive to Albuquerque. I’m right here in Santa Fe. I’m well-qualified to deal with these issues and we can talk about many different approaches to discover what’s really right for you. If I don’t think that I’m the right surgeon for a particular procedure, or I don’t think a procedure would be good for your health and well being, I’ll be the first one to let you know. Cosmetic surgery is medicine—it’s about healing.”

  • Addressing Problems With Breast Implants

    It’s important to understand that breast implants are not permanent. Given enough time, things in the body change, and additional surgery may be required. Time isn’t the only cause of implant problems; we occasionally treat patients who have received less-than-perfect augmentations and need help to improve or correct any issues, or we see people who have been in accidents that have caused damage to their implants. The three most common issues are: capsule hardening, implant rupturing, and implant displacement.

    Capsule Hardening

    When a saline or gel implant is placed in the body, it responds by building a protective capsule of tissue around that implant. This is a remarkable thing that the body does: it isolates the implant in its own chamber, increasing strength, safety and stability. Some women naturally produce soft capsules, and others produce capsules that can grow to become thicker and harder. The most common problem women have with breast implants is a hardening of the tissues (the “capsule”) that the body forms around the implant itself. This is known as “capsular contracture,” and when it occurs, the implants can begin to look too round, or irregular, and can eventually become painful. Most women who experience this problem have had their implants for 10–15 years. One solution is to surgically open the capsule, releasing the tension. More often, it’s better to remove the capsule altogether. In both cases, the body naturally repairs itself, growing a new capsule around the implant, which should remain soft for many years to come.

    Leaking or Ruptured Implants

    Implant manufacturing standards are constantly improving. We rarely encounter leaking or ruptured implants; however, it does happen occasionally. The implant manufacturer, Allergen, covers the implants for life and will replace them free of charge, although they will not cover the cost of surgery to replace the old implant with the new one. Though, in some cases, they will cover part of the surgeon’s cost.

    Under- or overfilling a saline implant beyond the manufacturer’s specifications can cause problems. Underfilling the implant can cause it to have folds in its surface that a properly filled implant does not have. These folds can rub together as we move around, creating friction that can eventually weaken or damage the implant. Overfilling can cause the implant to stretch too much, thinning the wall of the implant, and therefore making it more vulnerable to rupturing. Accidental trauma to the breast can sometimes cause an implant to rupture and slowly leak fluid or gel. And though in the past there were many fears around silicone implants, it’s important to understand that saline or gel/silicone implant leakage is not toxic, and extensive tests have found no long-term health hazards due to breast implant leaks.

    Implant Displacement

    Breast implant displacement means that the implant moved or shifted after breast augmentation surgery. An improperly secured implant may shift upward, downward, in toward the breastbone or out toward the armpit. In our opinion, the techniques for fixing these problems in the past were only marginally effective. Typically, a surgeon would open the breast capsule and attempt to suture (stitch) in order to relocate the implants in a better position. These corrections had a tendency to fail quickly; the sutures would not hold, or the implant might simply migrate around the correction or to a new area. We are pleased to say that today we have a much better way of addressing implant displacement.

    The technical name is “the neo-subpectoral pocket technique,” and it differs from older methods. Instead of trying to suture the implant into a better position, we open the natural capsule and remove the saline or gel implant. Then, we separate the natural capsule from the breast, and collapse it flat against the chest wall, changing it from a round, globelike shape to a sort of flattened pad. This pad of natural tissue is very strong and useful. We position it where we need to and replace the implant into the desired position. As the body heals, it forms a new capsule around the implant. The tissue below supports the correction, making it strong and long-lasting. It’s a really great technique.

    In all of the cases above, it is rare that we will reinsert the same implant; typically, we will replace them with brand-new ones. This is an opportunity to discuss if the size was just right, perhaps a little too large or too small, and make any desired size adjustments while fixing a problem implant.

  • Appropriate Expectations In Plastic Surgery

    Our impressions of plastic surgery are based mostly on what we’ve seen on television and in the movies. We’ve seen enemy agents undergo facial reconstruction to look like another person. We’ve seen patients select the nose they want out of a book. The impression is that plastic surgery can do almost anything for anyone. These ideas can be misleading—good TV, not good science.

    We’re not talking about nuts and bolts. When we talk about Plastic Surgery or Cosmetic Procedures, we’re talking about living tissues, and the body’s ability to heal. There are many other factors to consider, and they can vary widely from patient to patient. We’d never let you pick a nose out of a book and promise it to you. We’re not giving you a new nose, we’re not giving you a new face. We are altering your face or nose in some way. We are working with what’s there and modifying it within the parameters of your safety. We can change some of the characteristics you don’t like, we can reduce the signs of aging, we can make you look more youthful—but it’s still you. Your results shouldn’t look like it’s not you, and it shouldn’t look weird—believe us, looking weird is far worse than looking old.

    An immature physician may over-promise a certain result. The most important thing that substantial experience teaches a plastic surgeon is how to develop appropriate expectations in patients. If you don’t develop an objective understanding before you operate, and afterwards you haven’t met subjective expectations, there can be problems. Often you have to begin the operation and see the tissues directly before you can fully understand the situation.

    If a surgeon lets the patient’s expectations lead the procedure, tries to stretch beyond their ability, or strains the patient’s physical capacity, they can run headlong into serious problems. Surgeons need to perform procedures in the way that’s most familiar to them and gradually develop a deeper expertise and a broader vocabulary of methods. Haphazardly attempting new ways of doing things can greatly injure patients. A surgeon needs to have the clear judgment to know what’s within their current ability so that they won’t harm the patient.

    Here’s an example. A woman came to see us who had had buttock implants inserted and then immediately removed due to complications. The surgeon who had performed the procedure was attempting it for the first time and it backfired. He and the patient were both understandably upset with the result. When we were asked to take the case, we thought deeply then responded, “You know, this is a procedure that we may technically know how to do, but we haven’t done it before. It isn’t done very much in this part of the country, like it is on the West Coast and Miami.” We concluded that she would be best served by going to a place where buttock implants are performed regularly by experienced specialists. She may have been upset with our answer, but it was appropriate counsel and the right decision—one with the patient’s interest first and foremost, not a decision based on money, surgical ambition or a patient’s insistence.

    The most dangerous surgeon is one who does not have very much experience but still pushes themselves on the community as an expert. There are injuries and occasionally deaths at the hands of inexperienced plastic surgeons, often due to ambitious overreaching and poor judgment. Too often we’ve found ourselves treating patients who have had inadequate and problematic results by lesser practitioners. A few times we have been so angered by what we see that we have to briefly excuse ourselves—to regroup before returning to finish the consultation.

    We are not afraid to turn patients away. Sometimes it’s simply the right thing to do. Some people have had too much plastic surgery and still want more. We have to tell them honestly, “We’re sorry, you’ve already had too much plastic surgery and we don’t think it’s a good idea to do any more at this time.” They may get mad, but we have to be content with that. We once met with a lady who exclaimed, “I want people to come up to me and ask who my plastic surgeon was!” We had to explain that we don’t want anyone’s face to proclaim they have had plastic surgery. A good result, in our opinion, looks natural. We’re firm believers in moderation.

    The doctor/patient relationship is about having the patient’s best interests in mind; it’s about healing, not hair color. It is, in many cases, a very serious procedure. With balanced, expert consultation you can identify what things are being done that are effective, and in that way you can avoid media glitz and procedures that might not be best for your health or your appearance.

  • Plastic Surgery: Truth vs Marketing

    It’s our goal to get to the truth behind the hype, and to help patients make the best decisions for their health, appearance and well-being. Patients usually choose to have cosmetic surgery because they want, not because they need, the procedure. These personal choices are often influenced by stereotypes and aggressive marketing that can contain confusing and misleading information.

    For example: the “latest and greatest” in medicine is actually an oxymoron, because the newest things are always the least proven. What makes us able to understand if something is good or not is how it performs over time. If the product or procedure is just entering the market, it needs to be carefully assessed before we consider it for our practice.

    We’re not talking about fashion, we’re talking about medicine. If you are considering plastic surgery, you shouldn’t have to figure out what the right medical approach is all by yourself. You need a qualified physician to help you navigate available options and set appropriate expectations.

    This becomes more problematic when people present themselves as experts who are not. Some practitioners offer plastic surgery or skin care without sufficient background: dentists, pediatricians, family practitioners, and OB/GYNs. They might have attended a few clinics or seminars, but lack the surgical background and in-depth training.

    We cannot emphasize it enough: this is medicine, this is science. As physicians, we are entrusted to protect bodies and lives. At the Santa Fe Plastic Surgery Center, we are exceptionally well qualified and motivated to help our patients make the best possible decisions concerning skin care, injectables and elective surgery.

  • Recovering From Breast Augmentation/Implant Surgery

    After your operation, it’s important to let your body rest for at least 48 hours to avoid bleeding or increased swelling. Don’t do any overhead lifting for 3 to 4 weeks. Drink plenty of water, and slowly progress to other clear liquids such as tea or juice. Drinking ginger ale is good for nausea. Eat light foods as you can tolerate, and resume your regular diet after 2 days.

    Take medications according to the instructions on the bottle. If you’re taking strong narcotics, or if other pain medications make you feel “spacey” or drowsy, have a responsible adult administer your medicines according to proper time intervals. Under such circumstances there is a risk of accidental overdose, should you forget how much you’ve already taken. Advil or Ibuprofen may be taken between the prescription doses to help with inflammation and pain.

    You may wear a soft cotton bra with a formed cup—sports bras are not recommended. You can expect moderate discomfort and burning sensations, a gradual increase in swelling, black and blue discoloration, and slight signs of pink to red discharge from incision sites.

    Please call the office immediately if you are experiencing:

    • Severe pain that does not respond to medication
    • Dramatically increased swelling on either side
    • Bright red spots on the bandages which continue to enlarge
    • Uncontrollable nausea and vomiting
    • Fever above 101 degrees
    • If your bandages seem extremely tight

    Avoid smoking or contact with smoke after your operation to prevent coughing, the possibility of bleeding, and delayed healing. Do not drink any alcohol for at least four days after surgery — it increases swelling and the possibility of bleeding.

    For 2-4 weeks, avoid exercising and any strenuous activity. Even heavy housework will deprive you of the rest you need to fully recover, and exertion will also aggravate swelling. Wait two weeks to resume an active social life. Avoid aerobics, dancing, and other strenuous activities for about a month. Start these activities slowly and always wear a supportive bra. Avoid prolonged exposure to sun and heat for three months to avoid swelling and burns, and always use sunscreen.

    You may shower after 1-2 days if you feel like it, but do not let the water directly hit your surgical area. We prefer Bacitracin ointment on the incisions. Please do not use Vitamin E because it slows down wound healing. Do not use anything that your friends and family think will help with wound healing or scaring. Only use what your doctor prescribes. As you are healing, we will continue to help you with the scars.

    Your breasts will be sensitive to stimulation for approximately two weeks, so you might want to avoid sexual arousal during that time. Postoperative visits will be determined by your surgeon. We usually take stitches out the next week. Feel free to call us at any time — we want you to be as comfortable as possible during the healing period.

  • Recovering From Facial Surgery

    It is very critical that you do not perform any maneuvers that will generate a sudden rise in blood pressure the day after surgery. Examples are a constipated bowel movement, sudden coughing fit, or bending over and reaching down to tie a shoelace.

    Keep your head elevated for the first two days after surgery. An easy way to do this would be using two pillows or a rolled blanket under the head of the mattress. Keep your head in a natural and straight position. Do not hyperextend your head back or have your chin too close to your chest. You must lie on your back — do not lie on either side. If you bend over, or even let your head drop forward, the force of gravity may aggravate swelling, so keep your head up as much as possible.

    It is important to let your face rest after surgery. Keeping your head and face immobile as much as possible will greatly aid the healing process. Avoid talking, laughing or chewing. Start with water and if tolerated, progress to other clear liquids such as tea and juice. Ginger ale is good for nausea. Eating light for the first few days and sticking to a liquid/soft-food diet will help to keep your face still. Avoid very hot or cold liquid, and any foods that are high in sodium – as they will increase swelling.

    Take medication according to instructions on the bottle. If taking strong narcotics, or if other pain medications make you feel “spacey” or drowsy, have a responsible adult administer your medications according to proper time intervals. Failure to properly monitor these time intervals may result in accidental overdose. You may take Advil or ibuprofen between the prescription doses to help with inflammation and pain. Do not apply hot/warm/cold compresses to your face.

    Please immediately fill your anti-nausea prescription. You must use this medication as soon as you notice the onset of nausea. It is important to avoid vomiting because it may cause bleeding in your face. Call our office immediately if you are unable to control your nausea.

    After surgery, it is typical to experience moderate discomfort, gradual increases in swelling, black and blue discoloration, bloodshot eyes, and small amounts of blood on the bandages.

    Let us know if you experience any of the following:

    • Severe pain that does not respond to medication
    • Large amounts of increased swelling on either side
    • Significant blood loss evident on your bandages
    • Uncontrollable nausea and vomiting
    • Fever above 101 degrees
    • Bandages seeming too tight

    Avoid smoking or contact with smoke after your operation to prevent coughing, possible bleeding and delayed healing. Do not drink any alcohol for at least four days after surgery, as it increases the probability of swelling.

    Avoid sports and strenuous activity for one month. Even heavy housework will deprive you of the rest you need to fully recover. Exertion also aggravates facial swelling that may pull on the stitches or increase scaring. Avoid prolonged exposure to the sun and heat for three months to avoid swelling, and always use sunscreen.

    Feel free to call us at any time — we want you to be as comfortable as possible during your healing period. Stitches will be removed 3-7 days after your surgery, depending on the type of procedure and the location of the stitches. Additional visits will be determined by your physician.

    You may color or bleach your hair up to, but no later than, one day before surgery. No further coloring is allowed until one month after surgery. It is not recommended to invest in an expensive hairstyle shortly before surgery. Using a mild shampoo on your hair is okay, but only after the bandages have been removed and you have received your physician’s approval. Be sure the water is not too hot. Check with our office before applying any make-up.

Form Stable Implants (Gummy Bear Implants)

Form stable, cohesive gel implants provide a more natural contour. To date, saline and silicone implants have essentially been round. Even though we can get good results with round implants, a natural-looking breast tends to have a more “teardrop” profile. Some efforts have been made through the years to create implants that have a natural shape, using a cohesive gel, meaning a gel that could hold a different shape. The shortcoming of these implants was that they weren’t cohesive enough, and over time we found that they…

Addressing Problems With Breast Implants

It’s important to understand that breast implants are not permanent. Given enough time, things in the body change, and additional surgery may be required. Time isn’t the only cause of implant problems; we occasionally treat patients who have received less-than-perfect augmentations and need help to improve or correct any issues, or we see people who have been in accidents that have caused damage to their implants. The three most common issues are: capsule hardening, implant rupturing, and implant displacement. Capsule Hardening… 

You Deserve An Expert Injectorâ„¢

The face is extremely complex. Myriad nerve endings, thousands of muscle fibers, hundreds of glands, veins, ducts and layers. Add to this the fact that no two faces are identical—we age differently and develop wrinkles in a variety of locations and intensities. Carefully assessing the appropriate locations, choosing the right combination and the right amount of injections to achieve the desired results requires in-depth knowledge, finesse, and surgical precision. Facial rejuvenation is an art and a science. An artful eye…

Appropriate Expectations In Plastic Surgery

Our impressions of plastic surgery are based mostly on what we’ve seen on television and in the movies. We’ve seen enemy agents undergo facial reconstruction to look like another person. We’ve seen patients select the nose they want out of a book. The impression is that plastic surgery can do almost anything for anyone. These ideas can be misleading—good TV, not good science. We’re not talking about nuts and bolts. When we talk about Plastic Surgery or Cosmetic Procedures, we’re…

Choosing A Plastic Surgeon

Although many doctors claim to practice plastic surgery, not all have the same degree of surgical training. Motivated by profit, and taking a few seminars put on by manufactures of new products and procedures; many family practitioners, dentists, oral surgeons and even OB/GYNs have added some plastic surgery procedures to their practice, including certain types of skin care and injectables. Frankly, a few seminars and classes does not make anybody an expert. It takes much more time and expertise, particularly… 

Crows Feet Eye Wrinkles

A powerful and protective muscle surrounds the eye. In a split-second, it can squeeze the area shut, completely closing and shielding the pupil from harm. It’s also a very expressive muscle. Squinting, smiling and other facial emotions engage this area of the face hundreds of times per day. With decades of folding and refolding skin can develop noticeable wrinkles. Crows feet are wrinkles that radiate from the corners of the eyes. They are harmless and completely natural, but can make…

Natural Effects Of Aging: Forehead Wrinkles

The forehead is especially susceptible to signs of aging, simply because it’s so expressive. Surprise, concern, interest, disbelief, anger, joy and the majority of other human emotions all transform the brow and shift the eyebrows. Repetitive expressions over many years eventually become wrinkles, and wrinkles eventually become deep creases. These “memory lines” in the forehead have a tendency to make a person look concerned, stern, or just older than they actually are. HOW WE TREAT IT Muscles tend to work…

Plastic Surgery: Truth vs Marketing

It’s our goal to get to the truth behind the hype, and to help patients make the best decisions for their health, appearance and well-being. Patients usually choose to have cosmetic surgery because they want, not because they need, the procedure. These personal choices are often influenced by stereotypes and aggressive marketing that can contain confusing and misleading information. For example: the “latest and greatest” in medicine is actually an oxymoron, because the newest things are always the least proven. What makes us able to understand if something is…

Recovering From Breast Augmentation/Implant Surgery

After your operation, it’s important to let your body rest for at least 48 hours to avoid bleeding or increased swelling. Don’t do any overhead lifting for 3 to 4 weeks. Drink plenty of water, and slowly progress to other clear liquids such as tea or juice. Drinking ginger ale is good for nausea. Eat light foods as you can tolerate, and resume your regular diet after 2 days. Take medications according to the instructions on the bottle. If you’re…

Recovering From Facial Surgery

It is very critical that you do not perform any maneuvers that will generate a sudden rise in blood pressure the day after surgery. Examples are a constipated bowel movement, sudden coughing fit, or bending over and reaching down to tie a shoelace. Keep your head elevated for the first two days after surgery. An easy way to do this would be using two pillows or a rolled blanket under the head of the mattress. Keep your head in a…