Take a PAD Risk Assessment

Check Your Risk for Peripheral Arterial Disease

What is Peripheral Arterial Disease? Am I at risk?

Peripheral Arterial Disease—PAD—develops when the arteries in your arms or legs get clogged, and blood flow slows. Just like clogged arteries in your heart, if the arteries to your arms or legs become blocked, you are at greater risk for heart attack and stroke. The CHRISTUS Health assessment provides PAD information you need.

The review is an important tool. You’ll answer questions about your height, weight, blood pressure and smoking history. When you finish the questions, you’ll receive a detailed report of the signs, symptoms and treatment options for PAD.

How Can I Use This Report to Improve My Health?

One in 20 Americans over age 50 will develop PAD. Many people will not have symptoms, or if they have pain or cramping in their legs, they will not tell their doctor. They think it’s just a sign they are getting older. The report provides detailed information on the signs and symptoms of PAD and how you can lower your risk. Avoid PAD with simple lifestyle changes. Watch our video on the CHRISTUS Health PAD website page to learn more.

Take the First Step

After you finish the PAD assessment, you immediately receive a full report on what PAD is, signs and symptoms and the diagnostic tests used to discover PAD. Eight to 12 million people have PAD, but you can lower your risk. Early detection and treatment can improve the quality of your life and reduce your risk for heart attack, stroke, leg amputation and death. The assessment is the first step to finding out what is causing your pain and how to feel better.

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What are the Signs and Symptoms of PAD?

Age is the biggest factor. You are at greater risk if you are over age 50 and have diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol or smoke. Don’t ignore pain in your legs or feet, wounds on your toes, feet or legs, or changes to the skin color of your feet. Talk to your doctor, or contact a heart and vascular specialist at CHRISTUS Health.